All Montgomery County School Boards Have Seats Up For Election — Filing Deadline Is August 20

This is a big election year for local school boards. All school boards in Montgomery County will have elections this November, most for 3 positions. The deadline for filing petitions is August 20.

To qualify for most boards, a candidate must have 75 verified signatures. Centerville requires 150 signatures, Kettering requires 150 signatures and Dayton requires 300. Call the Montgomery County Board of Elections for more information (225-5656)

Here is a list showing the names of potential candidates who have taken out petitions. School districts not shown in this list means no candidates have yet taken out a petition.

Montgomery County: 3 Positions

  • Rep Terry L. Smith 10340 Little Richmond Rd. Brookville 45309
  • Rep Gary M. Roberts 121 Mound St Brookville 45309-1309
  • Rep Marla Joy Weaver 311 Village Parkway Dayton 45427

Dayton: 4 Positions

  • Dem Donald Allen DomineckJr. 1035 Superior Ave. Dayton 45402
  • Dem Joseph E. Lacey 161 Huffman Ave. Dayton 45403
  • Dem Stacy M. Thompson 531 Belmonte Park N, #604 Dayton 45405
  • Rep James K. Weir 1139 Highland Ave Dayton 45410

Huber Heights: 3 Positions

  • Dem Lucile J. Dale 7057 Pineview Dr. Huber Heights 45424

Kettering: 3 Positions

  • Rep George H. Bayless 2422 S Patterson Blvd Dayton 45409
  • Iss Julie Ann Gilmore 4171 Brookdale Dr Kettering 45429
  • Rep Frank C. Maus 181 Greendale Dr Kettering 45429

Northmont: 3 Positions

  • Rep James E. Westrich 11531 Rinehart Rd Englewood 45322

Trotwood: 3 Positions

  • Unc Deborah L. Daniel 8848 Post Town Rd Trotwood 45426
  • Dem Teena R. Davis 6499 Westanna Dr Trotwood 45426
  • Dem Denise E. Moore 5805 Shiloh Springs Rd Trotwood 45426

Jefferson: 3 Positions

  • Dem Rosemarie Slaughter 5257 Dayton-Liberty Rd Dayton 45418

Mad River: 3 Positions

  • Rep Cristina M. Pickle 5301 Eastman Dr. Dayton 45432
  • Dem Marilyn Steiner 846 Crestmont Dr. Riverside 45431

Northridge: 2 Positions

  • Dem Beverly Daws 2108 Tracy Dr Dayton 45414
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6 Responses to All Montgomery County School Boards Have Seats Up For Election — Filing Deadline Is August 20

  1. Eric says:

    Hmmm, what might we ask prospective candidates? How about:

    What is the role of local school boards in addressing the Ohio Democratic Party’s misinformation campaign on education reform?

    Here’s 3 more:

    1. Please speak to your concerns regarding the cost-effectiveness of the district, student enrollment, and district facilities.

    2. A future election may include an amendment to Ohio’s Constitution regarding school funding. Some local districts have passed resolutions supporting that amendment. Before considering such a resolution will you ensure the entire board is fully informed in a manner that leverages Ohio’s Social Studies Academic Content Standards and sets an example for the district’s students?

    3. An important role of board members is adopting school district policy. NEOLA, a legal association, provides policy recommendations intended to ensure that local policies follow changes to state and federal law. Recently, one district’s legal review showed those recommendations diverged from applicable laws. Do you support efforts to ensure board policy tracks the State Board of Education and community desires rather than advancing the goals of political coaltions of special interest groups at work in Columbus and Washington, D.C.?

    And here’s an old standby:

    Which books on school governance would you recommend?

  2. Mike Bock says:

    Eric, you bring up some topics I would like to know more about. When you mention the “Ohio Democratic Party’s misinformation campaign on education reform” I don’t understand the reference. You know, I hope, that you are always welcome to write your own original articles and post them here on DaytonOS. Post under “Special Reports.” This topic about a misinformation campaign sounds like a good topic for you to explain to me and everyone else who might be interested. Consider writing an article. And the question of “cost effectiveness” sounds like the start of another good article.

    Point 2: Help me understand what you mean when you ask, “will you ensure the entire board is fully informed in a manner that leverages Ohio’s Social Studies Academic Content Standards and sets an example for the district’s students?”

    Point 3: You write about recommendations from NEOLA, “Recently, one district’s legal review showed those recommendations diverged from applicable laws.” Again, I’d like to know more about this.

    The question I believe prospective school board candidates should be expected to answer should be a question focused on the future: What is your vision for this school district? What should this district look like in ten years and how will we proceed to bring that future to reality?

    Most board member candidates really have a stasis, unimaginative view that sees the future of their local school district basically as consisting of more and more of the same — their view is that the school system ten years in the future should be pretty much the same as it was ten years or 40 years in the past. Maybe more bells and whistles, but basically the same in terms of organizational structure and general purpose. This type of thinking is simply not good enough. The time for a board election should be a time when this stasis point of view is challenged and realistic options given to the voting public of how a better future can be created, and how local education tax dollars can be more effectively spent.

  3. Eric says:

    What is your vision for this school district? What should this district look like in ten years and how will we proceed to bring that future to reality?

    This would be an invitation for snake oil, and would divide the community. I’d recast it: “Do you support schools which prepare graduates to succeed in a global economy, or do you have other priorities? How will you achieve your priorities?”

    will you ensure the entire board is fully informed in a manner that leverages Ohio’s Social Studies Academic Content Standards and sets an example for the district’s students?

    This also addresses the misinformation campaign supporting Governor Strickland’s education reforms. Suffice it to say, Ohio has higher expectations of its high school civics students than the Governor has for endorsers of his reforms.

    Regarding board policy vendors such as NEOLA, they’ve not helped local boards embrace those 21st century skills we’re told are necessary for success. A more current example is the local boards withdrawing from OSBA.

  4. Mike Bock says:

    Eric, I’d like to know more about what you mean when you write, “the misinformation campaign supporting Governor Strickland’s education reforms.”

    I think it is fine to ask of school board candidates the question you suggest: “Do you support schools which prepare graduates to succeed in a global economy?” But, what candidate would say “No” to such a question? Candidates would also agree, I imagine, that it would be nice if all graduates were prepared and inclined for life long learning, for effective citizenship, and that each had found how to unlock and develop their own unique potential. Making big goals is easy. Remember Goals 2000? As Deming like to roar, the key question is, “By What Method”?

    The point is, no big goals will be accomplished in public education until it is recognized that the organizational structure of public education needs radical transformation — more of the same, trying harder, and tinkering, tinkering, tinkering, will not work to accomplish much. Check the progress over the last 30 years. Don’t wait for the system to bring radical transformation on its own initiative. It will only happen if “local control” begins to have some actuality, that is, if we elect board members — those who have the authority to make big changes in the system — who actually have some vision of the fundamental problem, and who reject stasis thinking. We need to encourage and challenge potential board members to show a commitment to address the future in a realistic way.

  5. Eric says:

    As Deming liked to roar, the key question is, “By What Method”?

    Not just “How will you do it,” but “How will you pay for it.” In House testimony, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Deb DeLisle said she would address the “hows” in December. Not much of a plan.

    See State of Ohio Education for more information on misinformation behind Governor Strickland’s education reforms.

  6. Eric says:

    Before considering such a resolution will you ensure the entire board is fully informed in a manner that leverages Ohio’s Social Studies Academic Content Standards and sets an example for the district’s students?

    John Stanford, Governor Strickland’s Executive Assistant for Education Policy, is soliciting resolutions in support of the alleged education reforms in HB-1. Good luck finding evidence of hgh school social studies skills. See State of Ohio Education for more.

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