At DaytonOS, in November, we averaged 428 visitors each day, and we averaged 1278 “hits” each day. A “hit” indicates that a specific article is accessed. As this chart shows, we were busiest around election day, and have been tapering off since then.

Sort of as an experiment, I placed five “channels” on DaytonOS to display Google ads. The revenue on these ads vary from day to day. My highest amount of ad revenue for one day was $3.63. Total ad revenue for the month was $21.36 or $.71 per day.

I’m thinking that if DaytonOS had fifty times the activity each day that it has now, the ad revenue would be fifty times as much. If the 428 visitors each day is multipled by 50 the result is 21,400. And if 21,400 visitors on average came to DaytonOS, I guess it would be a safe prediction that the the ad revenue would be 50 times as much: $.71 each day multiplied by 50 = $35.50 or $1065 for a 30 day month.

If it could ever be possible to have such a many-fold increase in activity on DaytonOS, the ad income produced from such activity could be used to hire some part time reporters or web-meisters.  As a web-site becomes successful, it gains capacity to become even more successful.  As they say, nothing succeeds like success.  Content drives readership.

DaytonOS has some big long term goals and plans. I am making a new strategy for moving toward these goals and I will write about that new strategy soon. The plans for DaytonOS requires getting a lot more people actively involved working towards a shared vision of purpose. This will require a lot of effort and my intention is to modify my lazy ways and start dedicating more time and personal energy to the project.

Right now, DaytonOS consists of my posts and the posts from Dayton area web-sites that DaytonOS syndicates. We syndicate these sites:

For each post coming from a syndicated site, for those readers who want to make comments, a link is provided to take readers back to the syndicated site.

DaytonOS has some readers who seem to check in on a regular basis, often making comments.  But the number of such loyal visitors is small.  Of the 400+ visitors we average each day, the great majority find DaytonOS while searching a specific question via a search engine.

I’ve gotten interested in analyzing the search phrases that bring visitors to DaytonOS. It’s sort of amazing that when you float a small bark out into the internet seas, someone, somewhere, is searching to find it. What is interesting is that oftentimes via a search engine, there may be hundreds of thousands, or even millions, of possible matches, but often DaytonOS articles are in the top ten.

My WordPress software tells the search phrase that visitors have used to find specific articles, and shows the search engine result.  This information is pretty ephemeral — only the last ten references are held and then the oldest is erased as new searchers are listed.

The last week or so, I’ve been checking the statistics periodically to see how people find DaytonOS.  Here are some of these references I noticed in the last week.  These show:  Search engine rank (position) out of (total entries indicated), Search phrase: the exact phrase used by searcher, The article found, the date the article was written:


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